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Pumps and Accessories

Pump Overview

Pumps are essential for several industrial, commercial, and residential watering/de-watering applications. There are many different types of pumps to choose from and there are several key factors to consider before deciding which pump will be the most effective. Additionally, the more you know about the surrounding variables of the task, the more successful the watering/de-watering outcome will be.
 
Most pumps on general jobsites fall into one of two categories: 

1.     Centrifugal Pumps

Centrifugal pumps have a rotating impeller that pressurizes and pumps the water through the system. General, trash, and submersible are the most frequently used centrifugal pumps. They work best with thin liquids, particularly water. Here are the three most common types of centrifugal pumps: 

  • General purpose pumps (also called semi-trash pumps) remove generally clear water. The design of these pumps calls for pre-priming the pump casing with water to help facilitate the continual “wet-self prime” process of water flow.

  • Centrifugal trash pumps (also called construction pumps) remove water that contains a percentage of debris. The pump-end is made to withstand the abrasive movement of stones, sticks, sands, and other items that are picked up with the water. The size of the debris that can pass through the pump is relative to the discharge size of the unit. The design of these pumps calls for pre-priming the pump casing with water.

  • Submersible pumps are the simplest method of moving water if the adequate electrical power source is available. Their internal design uses the common centrifugal approach to moving water, and immediately starts to push water once the unit is placed into the water source. There is no pre-priming required, and these pumps are categorized as:

  • General centrifugal submersible pumps remove generally clear water.

  • General centrifugal trash submersible pumps remove water that contains a percentage of debris. The pump is made to withstand the abrasive and movement of stones, sticks, sands, and other items that are picked up with the water. The size of the debris that can pass through the pump is relative to the discharge size of the unit. 

2.     Positive Displacement Pumps

Positive displacement pumps have a slower, more deliberate flow, making them a better solution for higher viscosity liquids and higher levels of solids. This type of pump typically provides low, but continuous flow performance that automatically recharges itself depending on the level of water. The design of these pumps does not call for pre-priming the pump casing with water.

How to Select a Pump

Pooling and standing water is a common problem on construction sites. Save yourself time and money by determining the right types of pumps to dewater your jobsites.

Types of Pumps & Accessories

Getting a pump for your project requires a good bit of planning because there’s no such thing as a single pump solution. To help you, we are providing information about the different types of pumps and when to use them. 

Maintenance and Storage

Regardless of the type of pump you get, it's important to properly maintain and store it. This can save you a lot of time and money in the long run.